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Community Forum > Oracle RAC on Quantastor in Softlayer

We are looking at possibly deploying Quantastor in a SL datacentre to provide storage for Oracle RAC infrastructure.

Are there any guidelines or recommendations for this?
I assume as SL don't support HA clustering, that a possible solution to get HA resilience would be to use Iscsi Oracle ASM mirroring across two storage nodes?

Another question regarding tuneables - If there are two separate storage pools configured on a node (lets say SATA and SAS) - is L2ARC shared between both pools, or can it be isolated to one.

Thanks

November 24, 2014 | Registered CommenterColin Graham

Hello Colin,

>Are there any guidelines or recommendations for this?

We provide a guide for solution design and sizing on our Documentation site here:
http://wiki.osnexus.com/index.php?title=Solution_Design_Guide

For Oracle RAC, you would want to follow the guidelines regarding Databases.

> I assume as SL don't support HA clustering, that a possible solution to get HA resilience would be to use Iscsi Oracle ASM mirroring across two storage nodes?

It may be best to discuss what solutions Softlayer currently supports with a Softlayer Representative. For OSNEXUS QuantaStor, the High Availavility Failover Group feature for our Storage Pools is not yet available in Softlayer with their current Hardware offerings.

You could use two QuantaStor deployments via the Workaround you are suggesting, In that case, you would simply create and assign hosts to the Storage Volumes on the QuantaStor Units to expose your required iSCSI LUNs and then use your Oracle solution to handle the HA mirror functionality on top of those iSCSI LUNs.

>Another question regarding tuneables - If there are two separate storage pools configured on a node (lets say SATA and SAS) - is L2ARC shared between both pools, or can it be isolated to one.

L2ARC is not shared and must be specified as a cache device for each individual storage pool.

Please let us know if you have any further Questions.

Thank You,
Chris Golden
OSNEXUS Support

November 24, 2014 | Registered CommenterChris Golden

Hi.

Another question on this (as SL support are generally just referring me back here)

At the moment the Quantastor config i am looking at for Oracle is as follows:

Dual hex core xeon CPU
*at least* 64GB RAM
10gig networking
ISCSI attached

For the Active Database - 4x 800GB SSD in R10 (should i use HW or SW raid?) Which theoretically should give around 27k iops.

For RMAN backups (large sequential write IO, and will also be replicated to another DC) - 8x 2TB SATA drives. Probably in RaidZ.

How does this config look? - Will performance be reasonable without needing a ZIL drive?

Any advice greatfully received.
Thanks
Colin G

May 13, 2015 | Unregistered CommenterColin Graham

Hello Colin,

I have responded to your inquiries inline below. One note, this forum is intended for our Community Edition support. For customers like yourself that have Enterprise Edition Licenses, If SoftLayer refers you to OSNEXUS support, it would be best for you to reach out to our support team directly via one of the contact methods on our support contact page here: http://www.osnexus.com/contact-support/

>(should i use HW or SW raid?)

We recommend using the Hardware RAID controllers if you have the option as the battery backed up write cache will enhance performance as well as provide easier Hot spare management for the SoftLayer Engineers to more easily service your system in the event of a disk failure.

>How does this config look?

This configuration would be fine for what we call a medium deployment, if you expect to have many thousand client connections to your Active Database, I would recommend that you add more RAM (128GB-256GB) to the system to allow for more ARC read caching of Hot data.

> Will performance be reasonable without needing a ZIL drive?

If you are running with SSD's for your main performance pool, we do not recommend the use of a ZIL cache device as you will get better performance with direct access to the SSD data drives. There is a good I/OPS calculator at the link below that helps in determining what I/OPS you could potentially get for different array configurations when they are hit with a purely random workload. It would help you get a better idea on what random I/OPS performance you could get for your SSD storage pool.

http://www.wmarow.com/strcalc/


Thank You,
Chris Golden
OSNEXUS Support

May 13, 2015 | Registered CommenterChris Golden